Parsha Behar: Leviticus 25:1-27:34, Jeremiah 32:6-27, Luke 4:16-21

To our 9:00 am Shabbat Ark of Prayer and the Mishpacha within,

This week’s parsha is Behar: Leviticus 25:1-27:34, Jeremiah 32:6-27, Luke 4:16-21

In Leviticus we are told by G-d about the Sabbath Year, the Year of Jubilee, redemption of property, redemption of the poor and enslaved, blessings for obedience, and punishments for disobedience. Wow, it covers a lot of ground about relationships with those around us and with G-d.

Shabbat rest from work is in itself an act of faith which proves our belief that G-d will provide for us. Everything I own or touch, my home, family, career, health, and my marriage all come from His generous hand. Although I readily acknowledge the source I often feel like I take the things that make up my life for granted and even as a right when, at best, I am a tenant or steward.

But the rubber of my rhetoric meets the asphalt of my life when I contemplate not working for a year and living on the reserves I’ve laid up in the previous six years as He instructed Israel to do. To be able to afford to do that would be a radically different lifestyle than the one that I have lived.

Having more than a little asphalt in my life I have come to understand that true contentment comes only when I accept my life, with all that it contains, as belonging to Him. It is easier to give up my health or house or etc. if I have accepted that it never belonged to me in the first place. And it makes it easier, during the trial, to give glory to G-d and to act on opportunities to be that light shining in the world. Who can live such a radicle life in isolation? I certainly can’t.

The fellowship of G-d’s people was always intended as redemptive; emotionally, spiritually and physically, those in need were cared for by those with plenty. Similarly, my food recovery depends on those with more recovery than me, sharing their hope and experience with me.

I and, I believe, we can not live a holly life that shows growing fruits of the Spirit, without one another. It takes support and encouragement (a relationship beyond Shabbat) with those in G-d’s family who are closest to me to live a successful life that follows our Master.

Without forgiveness flowing in both directions in relationships, relationships are impossible. We see that even after harsh warnings about the consequences of disobedience, G-d delights in restoring those who turn away and repent.

So this week’s parsha is a partial outline about relationships and a hint about how we should pray. Relationships and prayer “on the mount,” (Behar).

Blessings to you and yours. Be daring in your prayers this week.

I hope to see you at our Shabbat prayer session this weekend.

Your brother in Yeshua in the TEVA TEFILAH,

Kurt

No comments (Add your own)

Add a New Comment


code
 

Comment Guidelines: No HTML is allowed. Off-topic or inappropriate comments will be edited or deleted. Thanks.